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Archives for January 2016

Snow From Winters Past

North Carolina experienced its first blast of winter weather Friday in the form of snow and ice. We’ve enjoyed nesting, celebrated power coming back on to warm our homes, and have tried not to fall into holiday habits that we’ve been ignoring — such as excessive carbohydrates and sugar.

As Mount Mitchell digs out from 66 inches of snow, we thought we’d take a look back into North Carolina snowstorms of the past and share images of winter weather.

Snow looks much more elegant draping across vintage cars and downtown streets.

Snow in Raleigh, NC

From the Charles A. Farrell Photo Collection, PhC.9, State Archives of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC. No known copyright restrictions.

Snow in the Carolinas

Intersection of Cannon Avenue (no longer in existence, present day vicinity of Dorothea Drive) and Saunders Street. Snow is seen on roadways, houses are seen lining the street 2-3 April 1915. From Carolina Power and Light (CP&L) Photograph Collection (PhC.68), North Carolina State Archives. No Known Copyright Restrictions

Can you imagine waking up to see the power lines down like this? We remember it during Hurricane Hugo, but not sure we’ve ever known snow to cause this type of damage.

Snow in Raleigh, NC

Pictured is Hillsborough Street in Raleigh, NC looking east from approximately present day Horne Street. The landscape is covered in deep snow, power lines are seen toppled over. NC State campus is seen in background with Tompkins Hall, Winston Hall, 1911 Building, and Syme Residence Hall also seen. 2-3 April 1915 From Carolina Power and Light (CP&L) Photograph Collection (PhC.68), North Carolina State Archive No Known Copyright Restrictions

Snow in Raleigh, NC

From the Charles A. Farrell Photo Collection, PhC.9, State Archives of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC. No Known Copyright Restrictions

The Grove Park Inn is one of our favorite spots and this photo of the Inn makes us wish we were sitting in a rocking chair in front of their roaring fireplaces.

Snow at the Grove Park Inn in Asheville, NC

E. M. Ball Photographic Collection (1918-1969), D. H. Ramsey Library, Special Collections, University of North Carolina at Asheville 28804

2016 North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame Inductees

On Sunday, October 16, at 2:00 pm, the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame will induct three new members: Clyde Edgerton, Margaret Maron, and Carl Sandburg. They will join the fifty-seven inductees currently enshrined in the Hall. The ceremony will be held the Weymouth Center for the Arts and Humanities in Southern Pines.

North Carolina has a rich literary tradition and heritage that we’re proud to support not only as writers, but as lovers of the written word. Our literary heritage goes back to the strong oral traditions and now includes the includes the non-traditional ways people are accessing and learning about literature including blogs, e-readers, social media, etc.

2016 North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame Inductees

Clyde Edgerton was raised in the Bethesda community near Durham and is the author of ten novels, a book of advice, a memoir, short stories, and essays. Three of his novels—Raney, Walking Across Egypt, and Killer Diller—have been made into feature films, and seven of his books have been adapted for the stage.

Clyde Edgerton

He has been a Guggenheim Fellow, and five of his novels have been New York Times Notable Books. Clyde is a member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers and is the Thomas S. Kenan III Distinguished Professor of Creative Writing at UNC Wilmington. He lives in Wilmington, NC, with his wife, Kristina, and their children.

Margaret Maron is the author of thirty novels and two collections of short stories. Winner of several major American awards for mysteries (Edgar, Agatha, Anthony, Macavity), her works are on the reading lists of various courses in contemporary Southern literature and have been translated into sixteen languages. She has served as president of Sisters in Crime, the American Crime Writers League, and Mystery Writers of America.

Margaret Maron -- 2016 Inductee into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame

A native Tar Heel—and a cousin of 2014 NCLHOF inductee Shelby Stephenson—Maron lives on her family’s farm a few miles southeast of Raleigh, the setting for Bootlegger’s Daughter, which is numbered among the 100 Favorite Mysteries of the Century as selected by the Independent Mystery Booksellers Association. In 2004, she received the Sir Walter Raleigh Award for best North Carolina novel of the year. In 2008, she was honored with the North Carolina Award for Literature, the state’s highest civilian honor. In 2013, Maron was named a Grand Master by Mystery Writers of America for lifetime achievement, and won the R. Hunt Parker Award for Significant Contributions to the Literature of North Carolina.

Carl Sandburg was born in a three-room cottage in Galesburg, Illinois, in 1878. The son of Swedish immigrants, young Sandburg spent time as a milkman, bricklayer, wheat thresher, shoeshiner, hobo, and soldier before making his name as a journalist, biographer, and poet. He won his first Pulitzer Prize in 1940 for his multi-volume biography of Abraham Lincoln, and his second in 1951 for his Complete Poems.

2016 North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame Inductee Carl Sandburg

In 1945, Sandburg and his family—along with their herd of prize-winning goats and their collection of thousands of books—moved to a farm outside Flat Rock, now the Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site. Sandburg died there in 1967.

The North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame:

The North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame was founded in 1996, under the leadership of poet laureate Sam Ragan, and is a program of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. Since 2008, the Network and the Weymouth Center collaborate with the North Carolina Center for the Book, the North Carolina Humanities Council, and the North Carolina Collection of the Wilson Library at UNC-Chapel Hill to produce the induction ceremony and to promote the NCLHOF and North Carolina’s literary heritage.

The North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame celebrates and promotes the state’s rich literary heritage by commemorating its leading authors and encouraging the continued flourishing of great literature. Inductions are held every other year. A list of inductees, as well as samples of their work and video clips of past inductions, can be found online at www.nclhof.org.

For more information, visit the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame at www.nclhof.org or the North Carolina Writers’ Network at www.ncwriters.org

Romare Bearden — Beat of a Different Drum Exhibit

Black History Month is kicking off in Fayetteville this year with the Romare Bearden Beat of a Different Drum exhibit. Original prints from Bearden’s only published children’s book, Li’l Dan, The Drummer Boy: A Civil War Story, will be the highlight of the Fayetteville/Cumberland County Arts Council. Featuring twenty-six original watercolors created by Bearden for the book, there will also be text panels with audio narration by Maya Angelou.

Join the Cumberland County Art's Council for Romare Bearden Beat of a Different Drum for Black History Month

© Romare Bearden Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.

Li’l  Dan, the Drummer Boy: A Civil War Story was published posthumously in September of 2003. The book tells the story of Li’l Dan, a slave on a Southern plantation. He loves to play his drum. When a company of Union soldiers announces the slaves have been set free, Dan has no place to go, so he follows the soldiers, who make him their mascot. When Confederate soldiers attack, Dan discovers that he is the only one who can save his friends.

Join the Cumberland County Art's Council for Romare Bearden Beat of a Different Drum for Black History Month

©Romare Bearden Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

LIL-DAN

©Romare Bearden Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

The free exhibition is open from January 22 through March 5, 2016, during regular gallery hours. An array of dynamic programming is planned around this exhibit, including a lecture by Diedra Harris-Kelly, Co-Director of the Romare Bearden Foundation in New York City, performance of an original play entitled The Color of Courage, lectures and music programs from the Fayetteville State University Fine Arts Department and a drum workshop for youth. Several historical components will be included in the display, including an original Civil War drum, a reproduction Union Soldier’s Uniform, a southern Civil War-era female outfit, a bayonet and an original painting of the Fayetteville arsenal before it was destroyed in 1865.

Join the Cumberland County Art's Council for Romare Bearden Beat of a Different Drum for Black History Month

©Romare Bearden Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Join the Cumberland County Art's Council for Romare Bearden Beat of a Different Drum for Black History Month

©Romare Bearden Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Join the Cumberland County Art's Council for Romare Bearden Beat of a Different Drum for Black History Month

©Romare Bearden Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

“This exhibition and related programming offers a fitting celebration of  an artist hailed as one of the most creative and original visual artists of the twentieth century, Romare Bearden,” says Mary Kinney, Director of Marketing at the Arts Council of Fayetteville/Cumberland County. “Additionally, we’re proud that the exhibit ties together many cultural components – Civil War and African-American history, visual arts and theater.”

About Romare Bearden 

Romare Howard Bearden was born on September 2, 1911, to (Richard) Howard and Bessye Bearden in Charlotte, North Carolina, and died in New York City on March 12, 1988, at the age of 76. His life and art are marked by exceptional talent, encompassing a broad range of intellectual and scholarly interests, including music, performing arts, history, literature and world art. Bearden’s work is included in many important public collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and The Studio Museum in Harlem, among others. He has had retrospectives at the Mint Museum of Art (1980), the Detroit Institute of the Arts (1986), as well as numerous posthumous retrospectives, including The Studio Museum in Harlem (1991) and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC (2003).

About The Arts Council of Fayetteville/Cumberland County

The Arts Council of Fayetteville/Cumberland County was founded in 1973. As a link between artists, arts and cultural organizations and the community, the nonprofit agency administers programs in partnership with a variety of local agencies to stimulate community development through the arts. The Arts Council supports individual creativity, cultural preservation, economic development and lifelong learning through the arts.

About the Fayetteville Area Convention & Visitors Bureau

The Fayetteville Area Convention & Visitors Bureau is a private, not-for-profit organization responsible for positioning Fayetteville/Cumberland County as a destination for conventions, sporting events and individual travel. For additional information, visit www.visitfayettevillenc.com or call 1-800-255-8217.

Learn More about Romare Bearden Park located in Uptown Charlotte.

Visit:

The Arts Council of Fayetteville/Cumberland County is located at 301 Hay Street, Fayetteville, NC